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Weinberg, Kaplan & Smith, P.A. - Marlton NJ Family Law Lawyer

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Know how to handle investment accounts in a divorce

| May 7, 2021 | Blog, High Asset Divorce |

Divorce can sometimes be more difficult when a couple has access to numerous kinds of assets. When people have investment accounts, they need to divide these between them.

According to Fidelity, people can divide investment accounts in several different ways. People may divide the holdings between them. Each spouse may receive half of the shares. They may also divide them according to the value of the shares so that each spouse receives an equal value. Additionally, people may also choose to sell their investments during the divorce process. They would then split the profit in a way that is equitable. A spouse that has access to more financial resources, for example, might receive a smaller share of the proceeds.

Perform an inventory

As people prepare to divide their investment accounts, they need to understand what exactly they have. According to the Motley Fool, people should sit down and look over all their accounts. Which accounts are in the names of both spouses? Are any held by one spouse? Can both spouses make choices about the accounts? The answers to these questions determine which assets a couple needs to divide and can also help ensure that people are on the same page.

Consider the taxes

Sometimes, dividing the investments may come with tax penalties. People may need to pay capital gains taxes if they decide to sell their investment accounts. Additionally, people may experience penalties for withdrawing money from some accounts. These penalties may affect the finances of both spouses, so they both need to understand how their chosen method of division may affect them.

As people divide their investment accounts, they should remember that New Jersey is an equitable distribution state. Spouses may not always be able to divide their accounts exactly in half.